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Atlas of the Holocaust

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Atlas of the Holocaust
Call No: 940.5318 G46a 1982

Call Number940.5318 G46a 1982
Dates[1982]; ©1982
Statement of ResponsibilityMartin Gilbert.
Creators & ContributorsGilbert, Martin (author)
Summary"Atlas of the Holocaust, the product of seven years' intensive research, is a unique record of the Nazi attempt to annihilate the Jews of Europe during the Second World War. Martin Gilbert has drawn each of the 316 maps especially for this atlas; all are fully annotated and are based on documentary evidence from an extremely wide range of sources. The Atlas traces each phase of the Holocaust, starting with the anti-Semitic violence of pre-war Germany, and leading to the German conquest of countries in which the Jews had lived for centuries.... Presented in chronological order, the maps bear witness to the tragedy of the Holocaust as it unfolded month by month and week by week in each of the Jewish communities of Europe. Also shown on the maps are more than two hundred acts of resistance and revolt, as well as areas of Jewish partisan activity, avenues of escape and rescue, and the fate of individuals." —Book jacket
ContentsList of maps:
  1. Deportations to Auschwitz, 1942–1944
  2. Birthplaces of seventeen Jews murdered by the Nazis
  3. Anti-Jewish violence, 1880–1914
  4. Anti-Jewish violence in Europe, 1918–1932
  5. Two thousand years of Jewish life in Europe by 1933
  6. The Jews of Germany and the triumph of Nazism, 1933–1938
  7. The Jews of the Saar, 1 March 1935
  8. The Jews of Upper Silesia, 15 July 1937
  9. The German Reich, 1935–1937
  10. Anti-Jewish riots in Rumania, 1935
  11. Anti-Jewish measures, 1935–1939
  12. Anti-Jewish violence and Jewish self-defence in Poland, 1935–1937
  13. The Jews of eastern Austria, 13 March 1938
  14. Anti-Jewish riots in Poland, April–June 1938
  15. Jewish refugees find havens in Europe, 1933–1938
  16. World-wide reception of German Jewish refugees, 1933–1938
  17. Jews in the western Sudetenland
  18. The Jews of the Sudetenland, October 1938
  19. Polish-born Jews expelled from Germany, 28 October 1938
  20. Destruction of the synagogues, 9 November 1938
  21. Jews of the Darmstadt region
  22. Jews sent to concentration camps, 10 November 1938
  23. The Jews of the Prague region
  24. Bohemia and Moravia annexed, 15 March 1939
  25. The Jews of Memel, 21 March 1939
  26. The German invasion of Poland, 1 September–5 October 1939
  27. The Jews of rural Poland on the eve of war: a sample
  28. Poland's largest Jewish communities on the eve of war
  29. German atrocities against Jews, 2 September–13 November 1939
  30. The Jews of Danzig, 1–17 September 1939
  31. The Gelsenkirchen deportation, 9 September 1939
  32. Jewish prisoners-of-war in Germany, 1939–1940
  33. The German-Soviet partition of Poland, 28 September 1939
  34. Jews murdered, or driven eastward during October 1939
  35. Jewish prisoners-of-war and non-Jewish civilians murdered, 1939–1940
  36. Easter labour camps by January 1940
  37. 'Lublinland' deportations, October 1939–April 1940
  38. Jews west of Ozorkow
  39. Rural Jews expelled, October 1939
  40. Polish Jews expelled from western  Poland, September–November 1939
  41. Jews expelled into Warsaw, December 1939
  42. Deportation regions
  43. The first Warthegau expulsions, 7 November 1939
  44. The first Kalisz expulsions, 12 December 1939
  45. Germany moves north, April 1940
  46. The Jews of Norway at the time of the German invasion
  47. The first deportation to Auschwitz, 14 June 1940
  48. Slave labour on the German border, May–December 1940
  49. Jews deported from Germany to the Pyrenees, 22 October 1940
  50. Jews deported to Gurs, 22 October 1940
  51. Twenty Jews with the surname Mayer who died in Gurs
  52. Jews forced into ghettos, October 1939–December 1940
  53. German euthanasia centres, 1940
  54. The journey to 'Padernice', 27 October 1940
  55. Warsaw Jews expelled into the Warsaw ghetto, November 1940
  56. Jews deported into the Warsaw ghetto, February–March 1941
  57. The spread of terror and death, January–June 1941
  58. Birthplaces of Jews executed in France for resistance, 1941
  59. Slave labour camps of the Sahara, 1941–1942
  60. Slave labour camps on the River Bug, February 1941
  61. Slave labour gangs, March 1941
  62. The German conquest of Yugoslavia and Greece, April 1941
  63. The Jews of the Banat
  64. The Jews of western Croatia on the eve of the war
  65. Rabbis and cantors murdered by Croat 'Ustachi'
  66. The Jews of eastern Croatia and the Srem on the eve of war
  67. Germany and Croatia
  68. The Jewish communities of Serbia
  69. Eastern escape routes of Polish Jews, May 1940–May 1941
  70. Russian Jewry: a sample
  71. The German invasion of Russia, and mass murder plans, 22 June 1941
  72. Some Jewish communities in the Volhynia on the eve of war
  73. Jews massacred between 22 June and 16 July 1941
  74. Jews massacred between 17 July and 31 August 1941
  75. More Jews massacred, 17 July–31 August 1941
  76. Eastern Galician killings, Summer 1941
  77. The Jews of Bessarabia on the eve of war
  78. Massacres, deportations and death marches from Bessarabia, from July 1941
  79. The Jews of the Bukovina on the eve of war
  80. Deportations and death marches from the Bukovina, June–November 1941
  81. The Bukovina
  82. The Jews of Estonia on the eve of war
  83. Estonia conquered, 3 September 1941
  84. Jewish communities in Bosnia on the eve of war
  85. The Jews of Bosnia murdered
  86. Massacre and revolt in September and October 1941
  87. Killings in the Kovno and Vilna regions, September–October 1941
  88. Further killings September–October 1941
  89. The destruction of the Jews of Croatia, 1941–1944
  90. Dutch Jews deported from Holland to Mauthausen
  91. Mauthausen and its sub-camps
  92. Twelve eastward deportations, 16 October–29 November 1941
  93. Bohemian, Moravian and Slovak Jews forced into ghettos, 10 October 1941
  94. Massacre and deportation, November 1941
  95. Chelmno death camp, the first victims, 8–14 December 1941
  96. Deportation, massacre and the first death camp, December 1941
  97. Global war: the U.S.A., the Axis powers, and Japan
  98. The killings of Jews continues: the Baltic States
  99. Jews marked out for death, 20 January 1942
  100. Jews marked out for death, January 1942, but beyond Nazi rule
  101. Deportation and massacre, January 1942
  102. The massacre of the Jews of the Crimea, January–April 1942
  103. Eastern killings and the 'Struma'
  104. Deportation, massacre and revolt, February 1942
  105. Escape, betrayal, massacre and survival west of Wlodawa
  106. Four death camps and the acceleration of murder
  107. First deportations to Belzec, 17 March 1942
  108. German Jews searched out for deportation to Belzec, 24 March 1942
  109. The Jews of the Würzburg region rounded up for deportation
  110. Three deportations from Germany to Belzec, 24 March 1942
  111. Mass murder, deportation and revolt, March 1942
  112. First deportations to Auschwitz, 26–27 March 1942
  113. Birthplaces of some of the first Paris deportees
  114. Birthplaces of Polish Jews in the first Paris deportation
  115. Mass murder and death camp deportations, April 1942
  116. Five deportations to Izbica and Belzec, April 1942
  117. Ten deportations to Chelmno, April 1942
  118. Nazi-dominated Europe, April–May 1942
  119. Deportation, massacre and revolt, May 1942
  120. News of mass murder reaches the West, May 1942
  121. Nineteen deportations to Sobibor, May 1942
  122. Ten further deportations, May 1942
  123. Jewish villagers resist deportation, 9 May 1942
  124. Distant deportations and an act of defiance, May 1942
  125. Escape, resistance, destruction, May–October 1942
  126. Distant deportations and massacres, June 1942
  127. A gas van ordered north, 9 June 1942
  128. Deportation, mass murder and revolt, June 1942
  129. The Jews of Holland on the eve of deportation
  130. Distant deportations, July 1942
  131. Deportation, massacre and revolt, July 1942
  132. The Warsaw ghetto deportations, from 22 July 1942
  133. Distant deportations, August 1942
  134. The Jews of Belgium and Luxembourg
  135. Switzerland turns back Jewish refugees, 13 August 1942
  136. Children under four deported to Auschwitz, 17 August 1942
  137. Deportation, massacre and revolt, 1–13 August 1942
  138. Jews assembled for deportation to Chelmno, 1–21 August 1942
  139. Twenty deportations from Eastern Galicia, August 1942
  140. Deportation, massacre and revolt, 14–31 August 192
  141. Deportations from Western Galicia, August 1942
  142. Massacre, resistance and escape in the Volhynia, August 1942
  143. Deportation and mass murder, 1–5 September 1942
  144. Deportations to two death camps, 1 and 6–16 September 1942
  145. Nine deportations to Belzec, 7 September 1942
  146. Jews murdered in the Caucasus, 9 September 1942
  147. Distant deportations, massacre and revolt, September 1942
  148. The Hirschsprung family deported, 15 September 1942
  149. Birthplaces of Polish-born Jews deported from Lille, 15 September 1942
  150. Bulgarian-born Jews deported from Paris to Auschwitz, 16 September 1942
  151. Deportations and revolt, 17–20 September 1942
  152. The 'family' camps in the Parczew Forest, 1942–1943
  153. Deportation, massacre and revolt, 21–22 September 1942
  154. Deportation, massacre and revolt, 23–30 September 1942
  155. Rumanian-born Jews deported from Paris, 25 September 1942
  156. Deportations to Chelmno and Treblinka, 23 September to 5 October 1942
  157. Seven further deportations to Treblinka
  158. Jews born in Africa and Asia, deported from Paris to Auschwitz
  159. Jews born in North Africa, deported from Paris to Auschwitz
  160. Deportations and revolt, 1–14 October 1942
  161. More killings, September–October 1942
  162. Deportation, massacre and revolt, 1–13 October 1942
  163. Thirty deportations to Treblinka, 15–31 October 1942
  164. Deportations to Auschwitz, 15–31 October 1942
  165. Further deportations, massacre and revolt, 15–31 October 1942
  166. Deportations and resistance, 1–6 November 1942
  167. Distant deportations and mass murder, November 1942
  168. Sixty-five deportations from the Bialystok region, 2 November 1942
  169. Jews deported from provincial France, 3 November 1942
  170. Birthplaces of some of the Paris deportees, 3 November 1942
  171. American-born Jews deported to Auschwitz
  172. More American-born deportees, birthplaces
  173. Deportation, massacre and revolt, 7–30 November 1942
  174. The Jews of Algeria and 'Operation Torch,' 8 November 1942
  175. Stalingrad, El Alamein, 'Torch'
  176. Birthplace of deportees from Paris, 9 November 1942
  177. Greek-born deportees from Paris
  178. Escape, deception and deportation, 10 November 1942
  179. Poles expelled and murdered, 27 November–31 December 1942
  180. Deportation, massacre and revolt, December 1942
  181. Three deportations, three massacres
  182. Gypsy deportations, massacres and revolt, 1939–1945
  183. Deportation, massacre and revolt, January 1943
  184. Distant deportations to Auschwitz, January 1943
  185. The last seventeen craftsmen of Dzisna, murdered
  186. Birthplaces of some who died at Drancy during 1943
  187. Eight Swiss-born Jews deported from Paris to Auschwitz, 1942–1944
  188. The Jews of Tunis at risk, January 1943
  189. The advance of the Allies, January–May 1943
  190. Some children deported to Auschwitz, 11 February 1943
  191. Old people deported to Auschwitz, 11 February 1943
  192. Distant deportations and the 'Factory Action,' February 1943
  193. Deportation, mass murder and revolt, February 1943
  194. The Jews of Macedonia and Thrace deported, 3–22 March 1943
  195. Twenty Balkan trains, March 1943
  196. The Salonica deportations from 15 March 1943
  197. The saving of the Jews of Bulgaria, 17 March 1943
  198. Distant deportations, massacre and revolt, March 1943
  199. Deportation, massacre and revolt, March 1943
  200. The Jews of Marseilles and Aix
  201. Deportation, massacre and revolt, April 1943
  202. Distant deportation, massacre and revolt, April 1943
  203. Six communities destroyed, 18 April 1943
  204. The Warsaw ghetto revolt, 19 April–8 May 1943
  205. Seven deportations, massacre and resistance, 4–25 May 1943
  206. Nine eastward deportations, June 1943
  207. Deportation, massacre and revolt, June 1943
  208. Deportation, massacre and revolt, July 1943
  209. Escape, ambush and resistance, 24 July 1943
  210. Deportation, massacre and revolt, August 1943
  211. Jewish partisan activity in the Bialystok region, 1943
  212. The killing of 1,260 children of Bialystok
  213. The Jews of Denmark rescued, September 1943
  214. Sweden and the Jews, 1939–1945
  215. A slave labour camp established, September 1943
  216. Slave labour camps, 1943–1944
  217. Himmler orders the evidence of mass murder destroyed
  218. The Jews of the southern Dalmation coast
  219. Distant deportations, escape and revolt, September 1943
  220. Five deportations to Auschwitz, 2–8 September 1943
  221. The Jews of Italy deported, 9 October–21 November 1943
  222. Deportation, massacre and revolt, October 1943
  223. Deportation, massacre and revolt, November–December 1943
  224. Escape and resistance, July–December 1943
  225. Jews deported to Auschwitz and gassed, January–February 1944
  226. Birthplaces of twenty-four of those deported to Auschwitz, 22 January 1944
  227. Turkish-born Jews deported from Paris
  228. Birthplaces of thirty of those deported to Auschwitz, 3 February 1944
  229. The Jews of northern Dalmatia
  230. The Jews of Albania interned
  231. Three deportations, March–April 1944
  232. Greek Jews deported to Auschwitz, 23 March–2 April 1944
  233. Deportation, massacre and revolt, March 1944
  234. Slave labour camp evacuations, March 1944
  235. Five Dutch deportations
  236. Four further deportations
  237. Alsace-born deportees to Auschwitz, 13 April 1944
  238. The Jews of Hungary and the German occupation, 19 March 1944
  239. The Jewish communities of the Bacska, interned
  240. Jews assembled for deportation, 16 April–23 May 1944
  241. Deportations from eastern Hungary, 15 May–7 June 1944
  242. Some Hungarian Jewish communities destroyed, 15 May–7 June 1944
  243. The Paris deportations of 15 May 1944
  244. Birthplaces of some of the Paris deportees of 15 May 1944
  245. Birthplaces of some of the Paris deportees to Auschwitz, 20 May 1944
  246. Jews executed in France for resistance, 1 January–5 June 1944
  247. Some birthplaces
  248. Jews, Greeks and Italians drowned off Polegandros, 6 June 1944
  249. The Jews of Zante saved
  250. Corfu Jews deported, 14 June 1944
  251. Distant deportations, June 1944
  252. Stuffhof and its satellite slave labour camps
  253. Seven Jews killed at Oradour, 10 June 1944
  254. Deportations from central Hungary, 15 May–8 July 1944
  255. Deportations from Ruthenia and northern Transylvania, 15 May–8 July 1944
  256. The Hungarian deportations continue: The Lake Balaton region
  257. Deportations form the Budapest region
  258. The Jews of the Papa region deported to Auschwitz, 4 July 1944
  259. Deportations from the Budapest suburbs
  260. Deportation, mass murder and revolt, July 1944
  261. Distant deportations, July 1944
  262. More Hungarian deportations, 1–8 July 1944
  263. Jewish orphans seized on 20–24 July 1944, and deported to Auschwitz
  264. Birthplaces of thirty-one of the children deported on 31 July 1944
  265. Birthplaces of twenty-three of the children deported on 31 July 1944
  266. Birthplaces of thirteen more deportees, 31 July 1944
  267. The Allied advance, 23 June–25 August 1944
  268. A labour camp evacuation to Auschwitz, 22 July 1944
  269. A 'death march' evacuation from Warsaw, 29 July 1944
  270. Evacuated by 'death train' to Dachau, 4 August 1944
  271. Deportations, death marches and revolt, August 1944
  272. Slave labour camp evacuations, 28 August 1944
  273. Massacre, deportation and evacuation, September 1944
  274. Slave labour camp evacuations, 25 September 1944
  275. Deportation and revolt, October 1944
  276. Evacuations and death marches, November 1944
  277. A death march from Lieberose, December 1944
  278. The Red Army prepares to advance, 12 January 1945
  279. Slave labour camp evacuations and revolt, 17 January 1945
  280. Slave labour in the Auschwitz region on 17 January 1945
  281. Death march evacuations from the Auschwitz region, 18 January 1945
  282. The Red Army advance and the Auschwitz region evacuations
  283. A further death march from Birkenau, January–March 1945
  284. Evacuation, massacre and rescue, 20–27 January 1945
  285. A forty-two day death march, 26 January–11 March 1945
  286. From death march to death train
  287. The deportations continue, 18 February 1945
  288. Evacuation and revolt, March–April 1945
  289. A death march across Austria, March–April 1945
  290. Five evacuations, 1–3 April 1945
  291. Three evacuations, 3–4 April 1945
  292. American troops reach Ohrdruf, 4 April 1945
  293. Four further evacuations, 8–16 April 1945
  294. British troops reach Belsen, 15 April 1945
  295. Death marches from Ravensbrück and Sachsenhausen, 19–25 April 1945
  296. French forces reach four mass murder sites, 25 April 1945
  297. European birthplaces of the dead of Tuttlingen
  298. The Strutthof sea evacuation, 26 April 1945
  299. Three evacuations, April–May 1945
  300. Jews murdered in Mauthausen, January–May 1945
  301. Fifteen thousand Gypsies murdered in Mauthausen, January–May 1945
  302. Homosexuals murdered, January–May 1945
  303. Jehovah's Witnesses murdered
  304. Spanish internees and Russian prisoners-of-war murdered
  305. A final death march, 1–5 May 1945
  306. The death of Geza Havas, 5 May 1945
  307. The last liberations, 5–8 May 1945
  308. Women survivors of the camps dying in Sweden, May–November 1945
  309. Three young survivors reach Ulm
  310. Some birthplaces of Dachau survivors
  311. More Dachau survivors, May 1945
  312. Survivors of the camps leave continental Europe, 1945–1950
  313. One man's journey, 17 January–24 October 1945
  314. Post-war killings and the flight of the survivors 1944–1948
  315. Survivors, and those who returned, 1945
  316. Jews murdered in Nazi Europe, 1939–1945: an estimate
Physical Description 1 atlas (256 pages) : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
Carrier Typevolume
LanguageEnglish
PublisherLondon: Michael Joseph
Notes
  • Bibliography: pages 246–254
  • Includes index
RecognitionGifted in 2007 by the family of Sam & Sella Heller