Scream the truth at the world : Emanuel Ringelblum and the hidden archive of the Warsaw ghetto : Museum of Jewish Heritage—A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, November 7, 2001–February 18, 2002 
Book cover

Scream the truth at the world : Emanuel Ringelblum and the hidden archive of the Warsaw ghetto : Museum of Jewish Heritage—A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, November 7, 2001–February 18, 2002 

Library Item

Find or request this item
Scream the truth at the world : Emanuel Ringelblum and the hidden archive of the Warsaw ghetto : Museum of Jewish Heritage—A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, November 7, 2001–February 18, 2002 
Call No: 943.8053 R58s

Call Number943.8053 R58s
Dates©2001
Statement of Responsibility[curatorial direction Ruta Sakowska, Bonnie Gurewitsch ; catalogue editor and project manager Louis D. Levine].
SummaryScream the Truth at the World — Emanuel Ringelblum and the Hidden Archive of the Warsaw Ghetto started with one man and an idea. Dr. Emanuel Ringelblum wanted to tell the world the horror the Polish Jews were suffering during World War II, so he enlisted a few dozen men and women to form Oyneg Shabbes (Sabbath Joy). The group collected the diaries, manuscripts and documents of Warsaw Jews, not only to tell the rest of the world what has happening at the time but also in hopes of later using the items as evidence of war crimes. Concerned that the collection should survive, even if they did not, Oyneg Shabbes buried the archive. In 1946, ten tin boxes containing part of the archive were uncovered; in 1950, two milk cans with more items were found. The exhibit includes original artifacts from the archive, as well as photographs and reproductions of letters.—Publisher
Physical Description x, 93 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm
Carrier Typevolume
LanguageEnglish, Includes facsimiles of documents in German, Hebrew, Polish and Yiddish.
Publisher[Warszawa] : Zydowski Instytut Historyczny
Notes
  • Translation from German of: Oneg Schabbat.
  • Includes bibliographical references (p. 93).
RecognitionGifted in 2008 by the Museum of Jewish Heritage—A Living Memorial to the Holocaust