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Spandau : the secret diaries

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Spandau : the secret diaries
Call No: 943.087 S74s

Call Number943.087 S74s
Dates[1976]; ©1976
Statement of ResponsibilityAlbert Speer ; translated from the German by Richard and Clara Winston.
Creators & ContributorsSpeer, Albert (author)
Winston, Richard (translator)
Winston, Clara (translator)
Speer, Albert (subject)
Summary"Albert Speer was Hitler's personal architect, confidant, and protege; Reich Minister for Armaments and War Production; and second most powerful man in Nazi Germany at the end of World War II. Speer was also the only defendant of the twenty-two top Nazis at the Nuremberg Trials to assume the burden of guilt for the Reich's war crimes. He was sentenced to twenty years' imprisonment, and served it in Spandau with six other top Nazi officials—Hess, Raeder, Schirach, Funk, Neurath and Dönitz... Speer offers an [account] of the psychological effects of imprisonment on his fellow inmates—their pointless arguments about the bureaucratic policy and war strategies of the Reich, their strict adherence to protocol in their dealings with one another, their petty quarrels over work details, their games to outwit the guards, and Hess's pretended loss of memory... [Speer] demonstrates his ability to bring the past to life in the many new insights he gives us into the complex personality of Hitler." —Book jacket
Contents
  • Preface
  • The First Year
    • Sentencing
    • The condemned
    • Night of the executions
    • Questions of responsibility
    • Hitler
    • Prison routine
    • Self-searchings
    • Christmas in prison
    • Flashback to trial and verdict
    • Hitler's plans to dominate the world
    • The children's future
    • Father's death
    • Göring's relationship to Hitler
    • Fear of Spandau
    • Transfer to Spandau Prison
  • The Second Year
    • Spandau
    • Clandestine communications with the family
    • Witness for Flick: Hitler and the industrialists
    • Clash with Dönitz
    • Evening meditation exercises
    • Behavior of the guards
    • Plan for a biography of Hitler
    • Dreams and books
    • Passion for working, now and earlier
    • Hitler as a music lover
  • The Third Year
    • Neoclassicism under Hitler
    • Knopf asks for my memoirs
    • Corruption in the Third Reich
    • Streicher
    • Interrelationships of the prisoners
    • Plans for reshaping Grunewald
    • Hitler and Mussolini
    • At the Berghof
    • Thoughts on disloyalty
  • The Fourth Year
    • Hitler's attitude toward Adenauer and Goerdeler
    • Dorian Gray
    • Ribbentrop and the responsibility for the war
    • Paris meetings with Vlaminck, Maillol, and Cocteau
    • Hitler: on crushing rebellions
    • Discarded shirts
    • Depression
    • Morning incident with Hess
    • Visit in Vinnitsa and Hitler's break with Schirach
    • Vision of the East
  • The Fifth Year
    • Washday
    • Horse manure in Schirach's cell
    • The Russians forbid a Christmas tree
    • Hitler and the Red Spaniards
    • Hess invents highway illumination
    • Hitler's last drive to Linz: building plans, his tomb, the Bruckner Festival, steel foundry
    • The imaginary theater
    • Hitler's crude jokes
    • My rock garden in Spandau
    • Experiments with peas and beans
  • The Sixth Year
    • Parallels to Carnot
    • Gloomy New Year thoughts
    • My daughter invited to study in the United States
    • Hitler as a psychologist
    • We are to weave baskets
    • The concept of loyalty
    • Neurath's nationalism
    • Hindrances to communication with Göring
    • Force used against Hess
    • Pan-Europe
    • Mother's death
    • Hitler on the destruction of the German cities
    • Gilbert's Nuremberg Diary
    • Back in the punishment cell
  • The Seventh Year
    • Harsher conditions of imprisonment
    • Newest developments in aviation technology
    • My last visit with Hitler
    • A walk in the snow
    • Publication of the Hess letters
    • Chocolate found on Neurath
    • Rescue plans
    • Dönitz considers himself head of state
    • Publication of a series on the Flensburg government
    • I begin writing my memoirs
    • The chair from the Chancellery
    • Cognac in Funk's cell
    • Neurath has an attack
  • The Eighth Year
    • Rumors about the release of the sick men
    • Funk and Hess malinger
    • Hitler praises Tito
    • Continue work on the memoirs
    • The Empire News on Spandau
    • Reflections on the failure of Soviet policy toward Germany
    • Some ameliorations
    • The duke of Hamilton's son in Spandau
    • Neurath has another heart attack
  • The Ninth Year
    • Neurath's release
    • My "healthy instinct"
    • Hitler on artists' political commitments
    • Elevation of the Party Rally ritual to liturgical status
    • Memoirs finished
    • Pulmonary embolism
    • Psychic collapse
    • Cheerful opportunism
    • Idea of circumambulating the globe
    • Raeder, Schirach, and Dönitz against Hess
    • My position on modern architecture
    • In the puszta
    • Raeder is released
  • The Tenth Year
    • Hopes of dissolution of Spandau
    • Petition for mercy submitted
    • Speidel and McCloy try to help me
    • Renewed depression
    • Hess ordered to work
    • Funk falls ill; Neurath dies
    • History of the window begun
    • Confrontation with Dönitz
    • Dönitz released
  • The Eleventh Year
    • Hope from Washington
    • Hess again pretends loss of memory
    • Funk's gamble with his life to force release
    • Schirach plants the Soviet star in the garden
    • Chesterton on Caesarean demagogues
    • The Third Reich as an aspect of romanticism
    • Hitler's lack of interest in literature
    • Out of doors at night for the first time
  • The Twelfth Year
    • The first satellite and my anxiety
    • Raeder creates legends
    • Medical aide forced into service as NKVD agent for Spandau, and must leave
    • Self-idolatry in the oak grove at Nuremberg
    • Funk's atrocity stories in the German press
    • Reflections on a hawk's feather
    • Ambassador David Bruce visits Spandau, brings regards from McCloy
  • The Thirteenth Year
    • Hess tells stories about the past
    • Dream: tramping through the Eastern sector of Berlin
    • The industrial backwardness of the GDR
    • Dönitz's Memoirs disappointing because evasive
    • Hitler's esteem for him
    • Spandau garden converted into miniature park
    • Karl Barth, the theologian, sends regards
    • Arrive in Peking
    • Thoughts on the second front in the air
    • Effectiveness of the bombings
  • The Fourteenth Year
    • Hess weakens
    • His attempted suicide: an "operation"
    • On Hitler's Table Talk
    • Blomberg: Hitler the most brilliant strategist
    • The dilettante
    • Karl May, the model for crises
    • Spandau: a monastic life
    • Schirach's prison friendship with Hess begins
    • Operas dealing with love not permitted
    • Eichmann and Hitler's hatred for the Jews
  • The Fifteenth Year
    • Schirach denies that a second volume of Mein Kampf exists
    • The "golden" twenties
    • George Ball receives my daughter
    • My preference for renaissances
    • Adenauer will favor my release
    • The second sunken rock garden
    • Intensified work schedule
  • The Sixteenth Year
    • East-West contacts in Spandau during the Berlin crisis
    • Charles de Gaulle intervenes
    • Aesthetic and moral decadence made Hitler possible
    • Pocket transistor radio in the cell
    • Spandau has become home
    • Hess fights for his last teeth, and wins
    • Necrophilic dream about Hitler
  • The Seventeenth Year
    • Psychically adrift
    • Willy Brandt has promised to help
    • Conversation with Hess about independent actions inside the party
    • Hess invents a snow plow
    • Hess's hate complexes
    • Reconciliation
    • Arrive at Bering Strait
    • Discussion of this and other insanities
    • Fascination with technology in my youth
    • First granddaughter
    • A series of misfortunes
  • The Eighteenth Year
    • Sartre's characters even lonelier
    • Kennedy's assassination and the real tragedy
    • The regime's craving for beauty
    • Schirach in the hospital
    • The bones of Frederick II for the Berlin Soldiers Hall
    • What of value remains?
    • The pleasures of power
    • Hess irritated by a book
    • Minox camera in pocket
    • Khruschchev's son-in-law's encouraging hints
    • The end of architecture
  • The Nineteenth Year
    • Future prospects in architecture
    • Fall of Khruschev
    • All hopes shattered
    • Hess argues with the French general
    • Schirach threatens to denounce French guard to Russian director
    • Pass Seattle
    • What Hess discussed at his lawyer's first visit
    • Schirach's eye trouble
    • Hitler's determination to fight to the end based on the image he wished to have in history
    • My architecture of light
    • The irrecoverable loss
    • Lasting despair
  • The Twentieth Year
    • Crossing the Mexican border
    • Preparations and plans for release
    • Eldest son wins first prize in architecture contest
    • Shawcross says that he and McCloy urged my release for years
    • Career determined by deaths
    • My parents' home burns up in a dream
    • Hess discusses with Schirach plans for simulating madness
    • Hess convinced he should not
    • All that coal for Hess alone
  • Epilogue
    • The last prison day
    • Driving out the gate
    • A stranger in the family
    • Again content to be in Spandau
Physical Description xii, 463 pages, 40 unnumbered leaves of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm
Carrier Typevolume
LanguageEnglish, Translated from the German by Richard and Clara Winston.
PublisherNew York : Macmillan Publishing Co., Inc.
Notes
  • Translation of: Spandauer Tagebücher
  • Includes index
RecognitionGifted in 2016 by David Albaum