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Stolen legacy : Nazi theft and the quest for justice at Krausenstrasse 17/18, Berlin

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Stolen legacy : Nazi theft and the quest for justice at Krausenstrasse 17/18, Berlin
Call No: 940.5314 G61s

Call Number940.5314 G61s
Dates[2016]; ©2015, 2016
Statement of ResponsibilityDina Gold.
Creators & ContributorsGold, Dina (author)
Eizenstat, Stuart (contributor)
Gold, Dina (subject)
Summary"Dina Gold grew up hearing her grandmother’s tales of the glamorous life in Berlin she once led before the Nazis came to power and her dreams of recovering a huge building she claimed belonged to the family—though she had no papers to prove ownership. When the Wall fell in 1989, Dina decided to battle for restitution. Built by Dina’s great grandfather in 1910, the property was the business headquarters of the H. Wolff fur company, one of the largest and most successful in Germany during the early part of the last century. In 1937, the Victoria Insurance Company foreclosed on the mortgage and transferred ownership of Krausenstrasse 17/18 to the Reichsbahn, Hitler’s railways, that later transported millions of Jews across Europe to the death camps. The Victoria, headed then by a German businessman and lawyer with connections to the very top of the Nazi Party, is still today one of Germany’s leading insurance companies. But during the war it was part of a consortium insuring workshops at Auschwitz. When the Third Reich was defeated in 1945 the building lay in the Soviet sector—just past Checkpoint Charlie—and beyond legal reach. Stolen Legacy is the story of how the Nazis deprived a once prominent Berlin Jewish family of their landmark building—and the fight to reclaim it. This updated edition includes new evidence from archives in the United States, Germany, and Britain about the Victoria's wartime chairman who, post-war, received national and academic honors." —Back cover
ContentsForeword / Ambassador Stuart E. Eizenstat
Cast of characters
Glossary
Map
The building
Prologue

Part one
  1. I've come to claim my family's building
  2. H. Wolff
  3. My mother's birth
  4. Well-heeled nomads
  5. The gathering storm
  6. Palestine
  7. Entjudung
  8. "What would I do without the Lüneberger Heide?"
  9. Making her own way
  10. After the war: love and marriage
  11. Those who survived and those who did not
Part two
  1. A question of ownership
  2. My life in Britain
  3. What had my grandmother once told me?
  4. Our investigation begins
  5. Lawyers and wills
  6. The smoking gun
  7. Proving the line of inheritance
  8. The Reichsbahn's motive
  9. Claims and counterclaims
  10. Who's who in Nazi Germany
  11. Dr. Hamann and the Victoria Insurance Company
  12. Back to Berlin: the frustration grows
  13. The formal claim
  14. Getting their own back
  15. Light at the end of the tunnel
  16. Negotiating a price and dividing the payout
Part three
  1. New archives, new answers
  2. The evidence from Sachsenhausen
  3. The fate of Dresdener Strasse 97
  4. Fritz's life during the war
  5. Exit from the Reich
  6. Deutsche Bank
  7. The Victoria's history
  8. The terrible truth about Dr. Kurt Hamann
  9. Swiss banks and other matters
  10. An unwanted discovery
  11. A Stolperstein for Fritz
Part four
  1. Declarations
  2. The Victoria's war
  3. The curious case of Dr. Emil Herzfelder
  4. Directive 38
  5. Mannheim and Hamann: the missing years
  6. The enigma of Dr. Kurt Hamann
  7. Unfinished business
  8. 1943: Dr. Hamann is denounced
Postscript: a plaque at last
Select bibliography
Acknowledgments
Index
Book club discussion questions
Stolen Legacy Berlin tour
Physical Description xxxi, 328 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 23 cm
Carrier Typevolume
LanguageEnglish
PublisherChicago : ABA Publishing, American Bar Association
EditionRevised and updated paperback edition
Notes
  • Includes book club discussion questions
  • Includes bibliographical references (pages 305–307) and index
RecognitionGifted in 2019 by Dina Gold in memory of her mother Aviva Gold (nee Annemarie Wolff)